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Quantum Mechanics

posted May 22, 2018 21:55:28 by NervePinch
Hey guys,

As informative fun, please give an example of how quantum mechanics has been or could be used in play by a character with the focus or as part of your game.
Thanks.
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17 replies
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PatricHenson said May 22, 2018 23:43:42
Anything involving subatomic particles or other things that occur on a quantum level. Basically scanning really tiny things and figuring out how they react.
"Lease and pong life. Prosp long and liver."
—Varek of Sulkin'
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PaulNewland said May 22, 2018 23:55:18
Quantum encryption and quantum computing are likely in use. Hisenberg compensators. Phasing using quantum fluctuations?
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NervePinch said May 23, 2018 02:06:09
Thanks for the responses.

I was more looking for actual in-game experiences where the focus was used. For example, how was it used to create and advantage? Or, how as it used to solve and extended task? Or, used to create a complication for an enemy? Or, did your GM use it as a story hook?

That kind of stuff.
[Last edited May 23, 2018 02:06:39]
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Aldaron said May 23, 2018 06:32:45
A rift in subspace has appeared, and the characters suspect it might be a temporal portal. Verteron particles are emanating from it. Later, when hell breaks loose and they have to send themselves a message back into the past, a character can use a Diff 4 Reason + Insight (Quantum Mechanics) task to figure out that the particles on this side are entangled with those on the other side, and by generating a phased tachyon resonance pulse from the nagivational deflector they can cause the particles on the other side (and in the past) to vibrate "just so" to transmit the message.

Something like that? :)
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NervePinch said May 23, 2018 13:33:51
A rift in subspace has appeared, and the characters suspect it might be a temporal portal. Verteron particles are emanating from it. Later, when hell breaks loose and they have to send themselves a message back into the past, a character can use a Diff 4 Reason + Insight (Quantum Mechanics) task to figure out that the particles on this side are entangled with those on the other side, and by generating a phased tachyon resonance pulse from the nagivational deflector they can cause the particles on the other side (and in the past) to vibrate "just so" to transmit the message.

Something like that? :)
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Yup, thanks.

Most of the sciences are pretty straight forward but some of them, like quantum mechanics, I find pretty abstract in application in STA so examples are helpful. Hopefully, the Science Division book coming out can help clarify these things. Your verteron particles reference also lead me to check them out and I actually can use it in my up coming game. : )

If anyone has other examples I'd love to hear them!
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Aldaron said May 23, 2018 23:55:46
I would say doing anything "whacky" with the transporters, replicators, or holodecks could be a good indicator of quantum mechanics; essentially, any time a character needs to manipulate subatomic particles beyond the "norm", you could argue for QM to be involved. Increasing the gain on a transporter without pattern enhancers, attempting to replicate something normally not replicable (such as latinum, for example).
Holodecks are a funny thing - we know holodeck matter isn't supposed to be able to be removed from the holodeck, but we also know the holodeck uses replicators for simpler stuff which *can* be removed (Wesley's water balloon that hits Picard outside the arch, for example). Maybe a character wants to bypass the normal replicators and create an object on the holodeck that could be removed (a weapon, maybe) - doing so would, in my opinion, definitely allow a Quantum Mechanics bonus.
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Aldaron said May 23, 2018 23:56:12
Oh, also - modifications to quantum torpedoes should allow it, as well.
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NervePinch said May 24, 2018 00:54:16
Very cool, Aldaron!

I came up with something after watching a video on QM:

Situation - There is a cloaked Romulan Bird of Prey nearby and will attack shortly.

The player uses QM to alter and super charge senors to detect otherwise hidden elements in the light spectrum or power buildups like plasma. The GM could say the super charge puts pressure on the senors so in time it would burn them out but it could have limited use.

Sound reasonable?
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Aldaron said May 24, 2018 02:14:04
I would say that Geordi's tachyon detection grid that he developed to pick up Romulan warbirds during the Klingon Civil War would definitely fall under this auspice. And the 31st century tech the NX-01 used to pick up cloaked Suliban ships even used "quantum" in its name, if memory serves, though it's been a while.
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PicardX said May 24, 2018 02:35:19
Quantum Beacons
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TimKellogg said May 24, 2018 17:09:54
Sounds like I need to finish watching ENTERPRISE!
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TimKellogg said May 24, 2018 17:16:06
@Nervepinch: Memory Alpha states the Quantum Beacons developed for use against the Suliban were found not to work against the more sophisticated cloak of the Romulans. Also, the Beta Quadrant book specifies that Klingon cloaks are not as efficient/sophisticated as the Romulans. Detecting a Klingon cloak is a Difficulty 4, as opposed to a Romulan cloak which would be Difficulty 5 (impossible).
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David.S.McBride said May 24, 2018 19:02:26
First post on this site - first of all, my deepest thanks and gratitude to Modiphius for resurrecting and invigorating an RPG genre that had sustained a near-mortal wound with the Decipher years. In addition, utilizing a game engine that veers a sharp 90 degrees from FASA, LUG and Decipher's in terms of operation is also a welcome change of tact. While I have to make it clear that I'm a bit short on actual STA gaming materials - waiting to get the Collector's Edition, just making do with the GM Screen and "These are the Voyages" at current, along with Modiphius' most welcome YouTube videos - and thus have a likely less-than-complete understanding of the game mechanics, I find the entire subject matter of quantum mechanics fascinating (yeah, yeah, giggle all you want at the word choice) and feel it'd be great for both the game as a whole, AND infusing a little understanding and literacy as to the nature of a (relatively) new scientific field into the gaming population.

Regarding working quantum mechanics into the game engine, my first advisement would be to try to use Science to crack levels of difficulty. E.g., if a Science difficulty 4 roll is made, such could reduce the roll needed to detect that pesky Romulan Warbird, not to mention that a couple of players/characters making rolls for related subjects could add to the Momentum and reduce further the number/s required. Engineering, with a little properly applied imagination on the player/GM's part, could, I think, also be put to effective use.

Also, thanks to TimKellogg for the "Beta Quadrant" notation; gives an indication as to why James Kirk was able to pick up a Klingon Bird of Prey through simple visual detection where the Romulans would be doing the ninjas-in-the-grass bit.
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jonrcrew said May 25, 2018 08:18:45
@David: welcome to the fleet!

QM's actually about as old as general relativity, around its first century...

You'll find that the full rules include options for extended and compound task sequences that allow for this kind of progressive task management. Some people have found it difficult to get their heads around but, it works much the same as the combat system and I found it quite immersive.
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NervePinch said May 25, 2018 11:28:45
Yeah, doing extended tasks is just like combat but with different terms - stress = work, etc. All you need to do is figure out how long the task will take then divide your intervals.

When reading the rulebook I would often jump to the examples provided to understand a rule and in-game examples of QM would be similarly helpful. : )
[Last edited May 25, 2018 11:58:39]
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