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Modiphius > Fallout: Wasteland Warfare
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What paint set would you all recommened

posted May 21, 2017 17:23:43 by pctech1@gmail.com
When this comes out I'd like to be prepared to paint the minis. Any decent paint set you think would suit this?
I am also looking at the Army Painter stuff for Brushes.
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9 replies
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DCP said May 21, 2017 21:38:41
i'll admit i don't often if at all paint resin miniatures however i think the good old Citadel paint would be a good speculation choice for now
just someone who want's the best but always expects the worst
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SteveHanson said May 22, 2017 04:12:25
You'll need whatever paint you prefer. The secret will be in surface prep. You need to wash the figs in warm (not hot) water. Whatever feels comfortable to you, with a couple of drops of a grease removing dish soap. I use Dawn. Scrub with a cheap toothbrush, medium or hard bristle. Rinse with clean warm water and let dry thoroughly. I generally air dry over night. Next prime with a decent primmer or flat spray paint. I start with a black color and paunt my way to light so I use a cheap flat black spray, but you can work light to dark too, using a white or grey primer. Once this is dry usually pretty quick you can start painting with whatever acrylic or enamel paint you like. The last thing to be aware of is the clearcoat. Tbis is very important as it keeps the paint from rubbing off. I use Krylon Matte clear. Many people like testers flat spray, but it's quite expensive and only comes in little rattle cans. The paint companies all have spray finishes in their lines with varying qualities.

Also, when you spray, be aware. Of the humidity. If its raining or foggy wait until another day. I try to spray at below 50% humidity, but I've sprayed at higher and had success.

If you spray when the humidity is too high, primer will get fuzzy and clearcoat isn't clear.
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pctech1@gmail.com said May 24, 2017 17:59:06
Thank you for the tips. I live in Pennsylvania and Humidity isn't usually a problem.

I am leaning toward Army Builder paint , they have great oddball colors.

I really hope the arthritis in my hands hold out and I can paint these. Looking forward to Codsworth :)
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SteveHanson said May 25, 2017 02:57:04
Army Builder is a high quality paint. Be sure to thin it a bit when using it. It will go farther Nd cover smoother. Personally i use a cheao craft paint, like Apple Barrel, but i do have some Army Builder. Mostly wwii German specific colors.
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To his friend a man
a friend shall prove,
To him and the friend of his friend;
But never a man
shall friendship make
With one of his foeman's friends.
--Havamal
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SteveHanson said May 25, 2017 02:58:26
You'll want one or more.of those cheap craft pallets with the little wells in them
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To his friend a man
a friend shall prove,
To him and the friend of his friend;
But never a man
shall friendship make
With one of his foeman's friends.
--Havamal
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Mrbill317 said May 25, 2017 16:58:27
Thanks Steve , what do you mean little wells?
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Lane said May 25, 2017 19:38:02
Typical craft store pallets have round depressions in them, about 1" dia and 1/4" deep. That size will hold several drops of paint and water with plenty of room to wipe excess from brush.
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SteveHanson said May 25, 2017 20:38:28
Here's the one I use. They also make little round ones with 6 wells.
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To his friend a man
a friend shall prove,
To him and the friend of his friend;
But never a man
shall friendship make
With one of his foeman's friends.
--Havamal
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Jordan.Peacock said May 26, 2017 15:23:35
For terrain and other areas where I need to get a LOT of coverage on the cheap, I fall back on cheap craft paints such as Apple Barrel or FolkArt.

However, one problem I have with these paints is that they have a tendency to turn into "soup" after a few months (merely stirring up the paint doesn't do the trick to return it to a better consistency), and sometimes I have the misfortune of picking up a paint bottle at the store that has already undergone that process. With some of these paints, I can still make use of them as a "grunge wash" when I want to get some interesting effects on some stonework, wreckage, etc., but your mileage may vary.

The other problem is that these paints vary GREATLY in their opacity and application even when they're fresh. With Apple Barrel paints, for whatever reason, white and near-white paints /tend/ to be very opaque and go on thick (until they undergo the "soupification" process, and then they're nearly useless). This makes them useful for sloppy base-coating if I don't mind losing a bit of detail (e.g., I'm painting foam terrain), and for dry-brushing, but not so much for fine detail work. The brighter and warmer colors (yellows, oranges, reds) tend more toward the translucent, and really need to have a white or lighter undercoating to look right on the figure.

There are also certain colors that these craft ranges never seem to get QUITE right. I often have trouble finding a properly fiery orange or a rich purple, in particular.

For the figures themselves, I'll sometimes fall back on a cheap craft paint when I'm "assembly-lining" a large number of minis I just want to get "good enough for the table" without any great concern for quality.

However, when I want to paint up a miniature and make it look really nice (e.g., when I'm painting a mini for a friend, or painting up someone's personal character in an RPG), I find that it's worth it to use some of the more specialty paints. I've had good luck with Citadel paints, P3 (Privateer Press), and Reaper MSP. They tend to be just a bit more watery and thinner than the craft paints I often work with for terrain, so for certain techniques (e.g., dry-brushing) they don't always work as well, but they work FAR better for blending. IMHO, these paints work best when I either base-coat my figures white, or else base-coat in grey and then dry-brush white (to bring out highlights, with some depth), rather than painting up from black. Since the more professional paints tend toward being more translucent, they usually look nicer on a lighter surface, since the paint will end up thinner on the high points (showing more of the undercoat's tone) and tend to pool (and thus appear thicker color-wise) in recessed areas.

Citadel's Blaze Orange and Liche Purple are my favorite brilliant orange and purple miniatures paints, respectively. (And, no, I don't use a whole lot of orange and purple. It's just that for some odd reason, Apple Barrel, Folk Art and even many more pricey paint lines just can't seem to manage a bold look to those colors, at least to my eyes.)

For Fallout, I'm more likely to base-coat some of my models black and work up with grey highlights and detail work (for some of the robots, for instance) or else start with a grey basecoat, and highlight white, before I start applying colors. Bright and bold colors are at odds with the Fallout apocalyptic palette, IMHO. The closest to an exception would be the blue of a Vault-Dweller's suit (the "yellow" stripes I would depict as more of a golden tan), and even then a certain amount of weathering and grunging up is appropriate for anyone out in the wasteland for a time.

By greying and browning out the palette a bit, it helps to make bright pinpoints of color "pop" more when necessary. For instance, plasma weapons and Glowing Ones really need some brilliant green (P3's "Necrotite Green" is my favorite for this), but shy of installing micro-LEDs or fiber optics in every figure, we just aren't going to get much of that "glow" effect. If the rest of the figure is comparatively duller and darker, it'll stand out more, vs. if the rest of the figure were depicted in bright, garish colors.

(This is a reason why I have the roughest time trying to paint up the white shells of Retribution of Scyrah Myrmidons for Warmachine / Iron Kingdoms. They're shiny white AND they have glowing blue-green runes, but as far as paints go, pure white is going to register as brighter than the green-blue. So, instead I pretty much have to "cheat" and paint the figure in a mid-to-light grey with highlights of lighter grey (not QUITE the whitest of whites), then line those recessed glowy areas with a brighter white, and THEN apply my light blue-green glowing effects. On the other end of the scale, I have a much easier time with Cryx, with their love of black and dingy greys offset by neon glowing green ... or, say, painting up Darth Vader with black armor and red forced-light effects from his lightsaber.)

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